Building Innovative Sourcing & Recruiting Teams in 2015

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teams

Is your team doing the same old things when it comes to sourcing?

Are you frustrated that they just don’t seem to ‘Get it’?

Are you training and developing your team in the same way that you’ve always trained them but somehow expecting a different outcome?

Creating innovative teams who are testers, trialers, early adopters, creators and engagers is not an easy feat by any means.  But before you give up altogether think about how you’ve changed the way you train, connect, engage and challenge them.

Have you changed the way you do things?

If not, then why would you expect them to change the way they do things?  Now don’t get me wrong, there are definitely some recruiters and sourcers that do ‘get it’ and you don’t need to explain it again and again, but at times they are few and far between.

So how do we get our everyday recruiters to think differently and adopt the strategic sourcing strategies and activities that you need them to in order to ensure your business is moving forward and attracting and engaging with the right talent in the market?

1)   Assess how they are trained

So we all go and sit in a room and you take me through a PowerPoint presentation where you show the new sourcing channels that we’ll be using and then send me on my way.   I’m like a car on a cold, cold morning.  I’ve been sitting there ideally doing what I’ve always done and now you want me to warm up and get into action straight away.  The likelihood that I’ll stall is pretty high.   Whereas if you warm me up, get my mind thinking in a different way and challenge me a little then my ability to adopt the changes you want me to make are potentially more likely to take.

If you are training your recruiters, sourcer or staff in general and you need them to think differently, then you need to train them differently.  Think about how you can bring creative thinking exercises into your training session at the start so that your team understand that it’s time to get the brain working in a different way.  Many times we expect others to get on board but the way we engage them is same as what they have always experienced so they expect they don’t need to change either.

2)   Assess what you give them access to and what you don’t

If you ask me to do something different but I don’t have access to reporting or information that shows me how I’m tracking (only management receive those reports) then my ability to be accountable for my activity is limited.  Now I know that I’m geek at the best of times but one of things I love (don’t tell anyone) is google analytics.  It allows me to see what content has been shared, where my readers come from, what was received really well and what wasn’t.  By understanding what is working and what isn’t, it means I have the ability to tweak my strategy, content and activity based on response and engagement.

I know that not every recruiter can be reviewing this information all the time but what is when a campaign runs you share with them how it tracked, what happened, what worked and what didn’t. Teaching your sourcers and recruiters to be curious, to test and assess and test and assess again is how you build sourcers that understand how to build strategies, execute them and then adjust accordingly.

3)   Let them lead and put the expectation for change on them

Way back when, when I managed a team in London we had an issue.  In order for the team to get their bonus we had to have 98% data integrity rating.  Week after week we’d have the team meeting and I’ll tell the same people that there were errors in their information.  After several weeks and months of this happening I decided that each team member would own the data integrity for that week for the team.    That meant that before the meeting they needed to run a number of reports, they then need to communicate the errors and issues with the rest of the team and get those errors fixed before the weekly team meeting.

When the team members who were repeat offenders had to own the report and they were responsible for ensuring that everyone else did what they needed to do, it changed how they saw the issue. There was no way they could come to the meeting and have a report that had errors, and seeing how hard it could be to get someone to do what they wanted was frustrating for them (much like what I had experienced as the team manager.   The result?  By making the consultants who weren’t cutting it, be responsible for delivering the results required it  changed their behaviour and as a team we achieved our 98% data integrity target.

4)   Build innovative and creative thinking into the everyday

We get them to exercise process and do the same things every day and then all of sudden we say “Think differently, be innovative, give me your best creative thoughts” and we wonder why there is a stunned silence in the room.

When you want your team to think differently you need to provide them with a bit of a warm up.  If you’re training or having a meeting where you want some fresh ideas then give them a couple of warm up exercises to start with.  Maybe a quiz, maybe some creative thinking activities, brainstorming.  It doesn’t have to take long and it doesn’t have to be hard, it just has to shift them out of their process and pattern thinking so that they can start to use the right side of the brain to come up with solutions that give you what you’re looking for.

brain

image credit: http://huff.to/1EPdRL8

One thought on “Building Innovative Sourcing & Recruiting Teams in 2015

    kareermatrix said:
    January 19, 2017 at 4:58 pm

    Hi,

    You nicely narrate the recruitment frustration and off-course the same we faced while interviewing.
    Well KareerMatrix too is resolving the recruitment frustration through technology like Video Interview Platform for remote hiring, Code To Hire solution for robust technical hiring, Customized Skill Assessment test and more. Once request our free demo, and let us know with your feedback.
    https://goo.gl/JLGZD5

    Thank You!

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